Friday, 25 June 2021 09:26

CARDIAC ARREST - Saving someone’s life

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Did you know that there are SEVEN defibrillators around the Horsleys? Unlike a heart attack, where the heart tends to keep beating, cardiac arrest is a more sudden and dramatic event. Because the heart no longer pumps blood around the body, the critical oxygen supply to the brain and other organs is cut off, presenting an immediate threat to life.

In 2012 Fabrice Muamba, the former Bolton Wanderers midfielder suffered a cardiac arrest on the pitch. His heart stopped for 78 minutes but he recovered after medics administered 26 defibrillator shocks.

On 12 June footballer Christian Eriksen, 29, survived an identical collapse and was brought back through a combination of CPR – the manual cardiopulmonary resuscitation that involves repeated pushing down on the chest – and an electric shock from a defibrillator.

The high-profile incident involving Eriksen has reignited calls for the Government to make defibrillators a legal requirement in public places, including schools, sports facilities and other public buildings.

Defibrillators around the Horsleys

Bishopsmead Parade at the Parish Council Noticeboard

Station Parade on the fence of Maranello House

Horsley Sports Club, Pennymead Drive

The Medical Practice, Kingston Avenue

West Horsley Village Hall, The Street, West Horsley

St Mary's Church, Epsom Road, West Horsley

Effingham Mini Mart, Forest Road

If you think that someone has suffered a cardiac arrest call 999. Upon giving the location of the unit you will be given the code to access the defibrillator and the instructions for use.

Comment, by Estelle Stephenson, British Heart Foundation

Estelle Stephenson, Survival Programme Lead at the British Heart Foundation, said: "No training is needed at all to use a defibrillator.

"All you need to do is press the 'on' button and then follow the instructions on the screen.

"It will tell you to remove the patient's clothes and show where to place the pads on their chest.

"The device won't deliver a shock unless it detects a 'shockable rhythm'.

"So you can't injure someone with a defibrillator and that's the same with CPR.

"There's nothing to be afraid of. Use one - you could save a life.

"We just want defibrillators to be where people gather - the more the better."

"So you can't injure someone with a defibrillator and that's the same with CPR.

"There's nothing to be afraid of. Use one - you could save a life.

"We just want defibrillators to be where people gather - the more the better."

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